Monday, June 29, 2020

This Tuesday -live Shacharit Service and exploration of interesting Torah topics

Dear Friends,

Reopening continues! Tuesday -live  Shacharit Service in Social Hall Tuesday 6/30 @ 7AM
Please come early to have your temperature taken 

Public prayer is a contingent - although important, Rabbinic obligation
Guarding one’s health is a Biblical obligation of the greatest strictness 
Please remember these priorities!

Please observe all the directives  found in this document:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1UXGyYWX5nyIto7Plj6P0iS7xiGk9eQhg/view?usp=sharing

If you want Zoom login information, please contact Rabbi Yaffe 
Also on  Zoom  - Shacharit Service : Tuesday

 Pirkei Avot (Ethics of Judaism) Daily -Tuesday through Friday 6/30 -7/03 8:30 -9AM

Also on Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


New Zoom Service Mincha -Maariv  Tuesday @ 7PM



Note New Time  Topic: Torah in Depth -Weekly Torah Portion Tuesday  6/30 @ 07:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada) 

Also on Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1

Friday, June 26, 2020

This Shabbat and the coming week @ CBT

Dear Friends,

Please contact Rabbi Yaffe if you want Zoom login info

Shabbat Times for Shabbat Korach 6/26- 6/27 2020:
Candle Lighting  8:12 PM
Evening Shema should be Recited (again) no earlier than 9:05 PM
Morning Shema on Shabbat 6/27 no later than 9:01 AM -Recite three paragraphs of Shema before Synagogue services.
Shabbat ends and Havdalah is recited  9:22 PM

This Sunday - Annual Meeting Online
Coming up! Mastering Talmud Class resumes Sunday 7/05 (Next week!) 9:30 AM Buying, Selling and Price Gouging  - in  Tractate Bava Batra
https://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1

1. Friday Evening  6/26 @7PM -The Next Phase in Our Reopening 
Actual Services in Social Hall:
Please observe all the directives  found in this document:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1UXGyYWX5nyIto7Plj6P0iS7xiGk9eQhg/view?usp=sharing
Please let us know if you are coming (You can still come if you forgot)

Public prayer is a contingent - although important, Rabbinic obligation

Guarding one’s health is a Biblical obligation of the greatest strictness 
Please remember these priorities!

2. Shabbat Morning 6/27 @9AM - Service in Main Sanctuary 
Please consult with your physician before attending if you have any health concerns!
Please let us know if you are coming (You can still come if you forgot)

Please follow all directions of the Rabbis and appointed ushers. 
Please Stop by and come earlier if you can to have your temperature taken using our new, Israeli,  Tzomet Institute Shabbat Compliant thermometer.
Please observe all the directives  found in this document:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1UXGyYWX5nyIto7Plj6P0iS7xiGk9eQhg/view?usp=sharing
Please sit in the same place you sat last week

Public prayer is a contingent - although important, Rabbinic obligation

Guarding one’s health is a Biblical obligation of the greatest strictness 
Please remember these priorities!
Morning Shema on no later than 9:00AM -Recite three paragraphs of Shema before Synagogue services.

3.  Havdalah on Facebook Live  Motzei Shabbat 6/27 at 9:45 PM
https://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


4. Sunday Zoom Shacharit service 6/28 @ 8AM
5: Reopening continues! Tuesday -live  Shacharit Service in Social Hall Tuesday 6/30 @ 7AM
Please come early to have your temperature taken 
Public prayer is a contingent - although important, Rabbinic obligation
Guarding one’s health is a Biblical obligation of the greatest strictness 
Please remember these priorities!
6.  Zoom Shacharit Service : TuesdayWednesday, Thursday and Friday@ 7AM 6/23 -6/26


New Zoom Service Mincha -Maariv every Tuesday and Thursday @ 7PM


7. Pirkei Avot (Ethics of Judaism) Daily -Tuesday through Friday 6/30 -7/03 8:30 -9AM

Also on Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


8. Note New Time  Topic: Torah in Depth -Weekly Torah Portion Tuesday  6/30 @ 07:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada) 

Also on Facebook Live
https://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


9. The Jewish Course of WHY - Followed by Mincha & Maariv Zoom Service
6:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada) Wednesday 7/1 @ 6PM



10. Not just stories: Midrash Class Thursday 7/2 1PM  

Also on Facebook Live
https://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


11. Note New Time  New Class: The Big Idea  Thursday 7/2 @ 07:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Also on Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1

Sunday, June 21, 2020

Happenings at CBT tonight through Tuesday

Tonight - Sunday night 6/21 - Sivan 29/30 is the first night of Rosh Chodesh Tammuz
Please remember to say "Ya'ale Ve'yavo" in Maariv tonight

Tomorrow morning, Monday 6/22  is the first day of Rosh Chodesh. Please remember to say the full Rosh Chodesh service for Shacharit and remember Ya'aleh ve'yavo in all 3 services and Grace after meals. 

Rosh Chodesh has a second day and continues Monday night and Tuesday. 

Tuesday morning, 6/23,  we will continue phase B of our re-opening and have a service in the Main Sanctuary at 7AM

Please follow all instructions and precautions outlined in this document:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1UXGyYWX5nyIto7Plj6P0iS7xiGk9eQhg/view?usp=sharing

For those who will be at home  - the service will also be available on Zoom

Pirkei Avot -Ethics of our Fathers follows the service at 8:30 AM on Facebook Live and Zoom:

A Thought: Motives Matter. Today we begin Parshat Korach -about Korach's rebellion. Korach used all the right language "Everyone is Holy" -but he was fighting for his own power -not to help the people of Israel.

Friday, June 19, 2020

A few important notes for this Shabbat and next week

Dear Friends,
A few important notes:

1. This Shabbat is Shabbat Mevarchim -when we bless the upcoming New Month of Tamuz   -If you are praying at home please remember to recite the Blessing on the new Month found before Musaf in your Siddur. We also do not recite  Av Harachamim before Ashrei of Musaf

2. Rosh Chodesh Tammuz is Monday and Tuesday 6/22 and 6/23 -Please remember to recite the Rosh Chodesh order of Prayer . Our reopening weekday minyan will be on the second day of Rosh Chodesh

3. Shabbat Times for Shabbat Shelach 6/19- 6/20 2020:
Candle Lighting  8:11 PM
Evening Shema should be Recited (again) no earlier than 9:05 PM
Morning Shema on Shabbat 6/20 no later than 9:00 AM -Recite three paragraphs of Shema before Synagogue services.
Shabbat ends and Havdalah is recited  9:22 PM

Shabbat Shalom!

Thursday, June 18, 2020

Shabbat and everything happening all week long

If you want to join a zoom event please contact Rabbi Yaffe  on rabbi@bnaitorahma.org 

Shabbat Times for Shabbat Shelach 6/19- 6/20 2020:
Candle Lighting  8:11 PM
Evening Shema should be Recited (again) no earlier than 9:05 PM
Morning Shema on Shabbat 6/20 no later than 9:00 AM -Recite three paragraphs of Shema before Synagogue services.
Shabbat ends and Havdalah is recited  9:22 PM

Coming up! Mastering Talmud Class resumes Sunday 6/28 (Next week!) 9:30 AM Buying, Selling and Price Gouging  - in  Tractate Bava Batra

Also on Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1

Please don't share zoom information with anyone you don't know well -and trust

1. Thursday Evening 6/18:
@ 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
New Class: The Big Idea  
Exploring the big questions of the day and all-time from a Judaic perspective.
This Week: Revolutions, Protests and all that 


Also on Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


2. Services on Zoom Friday Morning 6/19 @ 7AM

No pre-Shabbat Zoom

3. Friday Evening  6/19 @7PM -The Next Phase in Our Reopening 
Actual Services in Social Hall:
Please observe all the directives  found in this document:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1UXGyYWX5nyIto7Plj6P0iS7xiGk9eQhg/view?usp=sharing
Please let us know if you are coming (You can still come if you forgot)

Public prayer is a contingent - although important, Rabbinic obligation

Guarding one’s health is a Biblical obligation of the greatest strictness 
Please remember these priorities!

4. Shabbat Morning 6/20 @9AM - Service in Main Sanctuary 
Please consult with your physician before attending if you have any health concerns!
Please let us know if you are coming (You can still come if you forgot)

Please follow all directions of the Rabbis and appointed ushers. 
Please Stop by and come earlier if you can to have your temperature taken using our new, Israeli,  Tzomet Institute Shabbat Compliant thermometer.
Please observe all the directives  found in this document:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1UXGyYWX5nyIto7Plj6P0iS7xiGk9eQhg/view?usp=sharing
Please sit in the same place you sat last week

Public prayer is a contingent - although important, Rabbinic obligation

Guarding one’s health is a Biblical obligation of the greatest strictness 
Please remember these priorities!
Morning Shema on no later than 9:00AM -Recite three paragraphs of Shema before Synagogue services.

5.  Havdalah on Facebook Live  Motzei Shabbat 6/20 at 9:40 PM
https://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


6. Sunday Zoom Shacharit service 6/21 @ 8AM


7: Reopening continues! Tuesday -live  Shacharit Service in Social Hall Tuesday 6/23@ 7AM
Please come early to have your temperature taken 
Public prayer is a contingent - although important, Rabbinic obligation
Guarding one’s health is a Biblical obligation of the greatest strictness 
Please remember these priorities!
8.  Zoom Shacharit Service : Wednesday, Thursday and Friday@ 7AM 6/23 -6/26



9. Pirkei Avot (Ethics of Judaism) Daily -Tuesday through Friday 6/23 -6/26 8:30 -9AM

Also on Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


10. Topic: Torah in Depth -Weekly Torah Portion Tuesday  6/23 @ 7PM


Also on Facebook Live
https://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


11. The Jewish Course of WHY - Followed by Mincha & Maariv Zoom Service
6:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada) Wednesday 6/24 @ 6PM




12. Not just stories: Midrash Class Thursday 6/25 1PM  

Also on Facebook Live
https://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


13. New Class: The Big Idea  Thursday 6/25 @ 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Exploring the big questions of the day and all-time from a Judaic perspective

Also on Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1

Torah Portion Synopsis: Shelach  - Numbers 13:1–15:41

Moses sends twelve spies to the land of Canaan. Forty days later they return, carrying a huge cluster of grapes, a pomegranate and a fig, to report on a lush and bountiful land. But ten of the spies warn that the inhabitants of the land are giants and warriors “more powerful than we”; only Caleb and Joshua insist that the land can be conquered, as G‑d has commanded.

The people weep that they’d rather return to Egypt. G‑d decrees that Israel’s entry into the Land shall be delayed forty years, during which time that entire generation will die out in the desert. A group of remorseful Jews storm the mountain on the border of the Land, and are routed by the Amalekites and Canaanites.

The laws of the Nesachim (meal, wine and oil offerings) are given, as well as the mitzvah to consecrate a portion of the dough (challah) to G‑d when making bread. G‑d instructs to place fringes (tzitzit) on the four corners of our garments, so that we should remember to fulfill the mitzvot (divine commandments).


A short sermon:
This week we read about the spies: They begin by praising the Land of Canaan (Israel) but then claim that the people of Israel can't possibly succeed in inheriting it. Sometimes we make an endeavor so big and wonderful in our eyes  we assume we can't possibly accomplish it  - "it's too big and I'm too small"

To this the two righteous spies -Joshua and Caleb  responded "Alo Na'aleh" "We shall go up". When we resolve that we can rise to a new challenge to do more with our Judaism - We should believe that if the idea came to us, we can do it! It is big but G-d who gives us power is even bigger.

Tuesday, June 16, 2020

Tonight's Class is at 8PM

Tonight's Torah in Depth class will meet on Zoom and Facebook live at 8PM rather than 7pm

Friday, June 12, 2020

Beha'alotcha 5780 Reopened Week 2!

Dear Friends,

We will be reopening for the second week on a limited basis this Shabbat for Shacharit at 845 AM.

All went well last week with everyone properly keeping to protocol 


Please consult with your physician before attending if you have any health concerns!

Public prayer is a contingent - although important, Rabbinic obligation

Guarding one’s health is a Biblical obligation of the greatest strictness 
Please remember these priorities!

Please follow all directions of the Rabbis and appointed ushers. 

Please Note: Please Arrive between 845 AM -8:55 AM to have your temperature taken using our new, Israeli, Tzomet Institute Shabbat Compliant thermometer.
Service commences at 9:00 AM
Please sit in the same place you sat last week

Before you consider attending please read the following document and we request that you RSVP before Shabbat (You can still come if you didn't but we prefer...)
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1UXGyYWX5nyIto7Plj6P0iS7xiGk9eQhg/view?usp=sharing

A. Online classes and events 
Please contact us if you want to join on zoom!


4. Pirkei Avot (Ethics of Judaism) Daily -Tuesday through Friday 8:30 -9AM

Also on Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1

5. Topic: Torah in Depth -Weekly Torah Portion Tuesday  6/16 @ 7PM

Also on Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1

7. Not just stories: Midrash Class Thursday 6/18 1PM  

Also on Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


8. New Class: The Big Idea  Thursday 6/18 @ 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)


Password: 248365

Also on Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1

Sermon
Join us at the Zoom service at 7PM to hear the Sermon

Friday, June 5, 2020

Shabbat Shalom: Naso -this week's classes



Facebook Classes

4. Pirkei Avot (Ethics of Judaism) Daily -Tuesday through Friday 8:30 -9AM
Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1

5. Topic: Torah in Depth -Weekly Torah Portion Tuesday 7PM
https://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


7. Midrash Class Thursday 1PM  
Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


8. Gateways to Prayer  Thursday @ 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Facebook Livehttps://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


Monday, June 1, 2020

An important article by Jeff Jacoby, columnist, Boston Globe

Indecent cops, indecent rioters

“There are two races of men in this world,” wrote the psychoanalyst Viktor Frankl in Man’s Search for Meaning , the profoundly influential book he published about his experiences in the Nazi concentration camps. “Only these two — the ‘race’ of the decent man and the ‘race’ of the indecent man. Both are found everywhere; they penetrate into all groups of society. No group consists entirely of decent or indecent people.”

Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer who used his knee to press George Floyd’s neck to the ground until he died in agony, belongs to the race of the indecent. So do Gregory McMichael — an ex-cop — and his son Travis McMichael, the two Georgia men who pursued and gunned down an unarmed Ahmaud Arbery after seeing him jog past their home. So does any police officer who deliberately uses deadly violence against someone who has no weapon and poses no threat.

The race of the indecent does not include men and women who are infuriated at the sight of injustice or police brutality. It does not include those who respond with nonviolent protests, demonstrations, marches, or civil disobedience. There is nothing indecent about those who cry out in horror and anger at the death of Floyd and Arbery, or demand political change to prevent such atrocities, or insist that the full weight of the law be brought to bear against those responsible for committing them.

But the legions of the indecent most certainly do include those whose reaction to the terrible violence inflicted against Floyd is to inflict their own violence — smashing, burning, robbing, and even killing— against others. There is nothing decent about the riots that erupted in dozens of cities over the last few days. There was only pointless destruction and inexcusable lawlessness. More lives were lost and countless businesses ruined. If the killing of Floyd was a sickening illustration of what the “race of the indecent” are responsible for, so is the anguish of black business owners, weeping to see their life’s savings reduced to rubble and ash.

Sickening, too, are those on the sidelines cheering as neighborhoods go up in flames, such as the filmmaker Michael Moore extolling the “good citizens burning down the evil police precinct,” or Essence magazine publishing a column urging rioters to “Burn It All Down.”

During the 1992 Los Angeles riots, in which scores of people died and hundreds of millions of dollars in damage was inflicted on mostly Korean-owned businesses, the rap artist Sister Souljah was one of those cheerleaders. In an interview with the Washington Post, she applauded the “rebellion” that was shattering much of the city and endorsed even more bloodshed:
 

I mean, if black people kill black people every day, why not have a week and kill white people? You understand what I'm saying? In other words, white people, this government and that mayor were well aware of the fact that black people were dying every day in Los Angeles under gang violence. So if you're a gang member and you would normally be killing somebody, why not kill a white person?



The most memorable response to Souljah’s incitement came from Bill Clinton, the Arkansas governor who was then running for president. Speaking before Jesse Jackson’s Rainbow Coalition in June, Clinton condemned the rapper’s words . He quoted her poisonous comments to the Post and an earlier interview in which she said all whites have a “low-down, dirty nature” and that “if there are any good white people, I haven’t met them.” Clinton told his audience: “If you took the words ‘white’ and ‘black,’ and you reversed them, you might think David Duke was giving that speech.”

Clinton took some heat for his rebuke — Souljah called him a racist and Jackson defended her. But most Americans appreciated his public stand against extremism. The phrase “Sister Souljah moment“ entered the lexicon as a reference to the repudiation of extremists, even when that repudiation might rub one’s allies the wrong way.

America today, far more bitterly polarized than it was in 1992, could really use some Sister Souljah moments. But there is little inclination in political circles, and even less among the media, to cool the fevers of racial grievance.

No one thinks that what happened to George Floyd was anything but horrifying and enraging. In a society where almost everything is bitterly disputed, the revulsion over Floyd’s death, and the desire to see his killers brought to justice, is practically universal. This is not a country that thinks it’s OK for police to kill black men. “I hope these cops are dealt with good and hard,” conservative talk host Rush Limbaugh told his huge radio audience . What they did to Floyd, he said, “makes me so mad I can’t see straight.”



There was a time in this country when black men could indeed be killed by whites with impunity, and when those witnessing their deaths were apt to be celebrating them. Morally, psychologically, and politically, we are light years removed from that era. Yet it has become politically incorrect to say so. Anyone who tries can expect to be shouted down by loud voices insisting that slavery and Jim Crow stamped America forever, leaving it irremediably racist to the core.

Police brutality is too common in this country. Some people have no business being entrusted with a gun, a badge, and the power to arrest. All the same, the Washington Post noted last year, killings by cops are “rare outcomes” in a nation with “millions of encounters between police officers and the public.” When those rare outcomes do occur, according to the Post (which has been tracking the data since 2014, when Michael Brown was killed by police in Ferguson, Mo.), the racial breakdown is surprisingly consistent: “45% white men; 23% black men; and 16% Hispanic men. Women have accounted for about 5% of those killed, and people in mental distress about 25% of all shootings.” In the overwhelming majority of cases, the person killed was armed; only 4% had no weapon. The killing of George Floyd, in other words, was an exception, not the rule. Saying so doesn’t make his fate less appalling, it makes it more so. To see such a thing happen to a fellow citizen is especially harrowing because it is such a desecration of what America stands for.

It was an intolerable killing, and no one is tolerating it. The men responsible were fired within a day. Chauvin has been charged with murder.

But just as intolerable is the stupefying mayhem being unleashed across the country in Floyd’s name.

“I am heartbroken. Waking up this morning to see Minneapolis on fire would be something that would devastate Floyd,” his fiancée Courteney Ross told the Minnesota Star Tribune. She described him as the most spiritual man she ever knew — “he stood up for people, he was there for people when they were down, he loved people that were thrown away.”

His employer, Jovanni Thunstrom, felt the same way: “He didn’t discriminate,” Jovanni said in an interview. “Whether you were Hispanic, you were black, you were white — he treated everybody with respect and that’s what I love about him.”

As Viktor Frankl might have said, Floyd was of the race of the decent man. It only compounds the indecency of his death that it is being used as a justification for riots.

The RCA Condemns the Murder of George Floyd

The RCA Condemns the Murder of George Floyd

The Rabbinical Council of America, the leading membership organization of Orthodox rabbis in North America, condemns the senseless murder of George Floyd. He, like every human being, was created in the image of Almighty, and the loss of his life is a tragedy.

Furthermore, we stand together with all who fight racism, bigotry and hatred. We believe that the equal rights and opportunities guaranteed by our laws are, as the founders of this great land proclaimed, "inalienable rights" which derive from our Sacred Scripture. As a faithful Jewish community, we stand together with all who defend the rights of others, especially the "widow, the orphan and the stranger."
We also condemn the lawlessness of the few who defile the memory of George Floyd and others, by rioting and looting. The key to effecting positive change is through peaceful demonstration, not through destroying property, looting and harming others.

"Our rabbis taught that society subsists on the three basic values: law, truth, and peace," said Rabbi Daniel Korobkin, the president of the Rabbinical Council of America. "We call upon those in government and law enforcement not only to preserve the law, but also to restore justice, fairness and a sense of compassion to all. Inciteful language must cease, and efforts must be expended which will educate our society away from racism and towards a better understanding each for the other."

"We stand resolute in our belief that the goodness of human nature will prevail, but we call upon everyone to end the violence," added Rabbi Binyamin Blau, first vice president of the RCA. "While the hurt and the anger felt and expressed today must not be ignored, the solution to our national pain will only come through peaceful demonstration, deliberate conversation, and effective action. As Dr. King said, 'Every man must decide whether he will walk in the light of creative altruism or in the darkness of destructive selfishness.'"

Wednesday, May 27, 2020

Shavuot: Yizkor -- DIY Tikun and and lots more


Congregation Bnai Torah has decided out of an abundance of caution to fulfill the precept of guarding life as a pre-eminent value of Judaism to not yet open actual services this Shavuot. We hope to open next Shabbat June 6th with great care and strong safety protocols. We will let you know as soon as final decision has been made. 

However, we have put together a full range of events and resources to enhance your Shavuot notwithstanding our physical separation. These will be presented in chronological order so please read to the end!


A.Facebook events

Please don't share zoom information with anyone you don't know well -and trust

2. Special Pre- Shavuot Midrash Class Thursday 1PM  
 https://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1

4. Pre Shavuot Yizkor Service
Since  electronic devices like cell phones etc can't be used on Yom Tov (except for emergencies) we will have a Yizkor Service by Zoom and Facebook Live right before Yom Tov.  
Facebook Live  https://www.facebook.com/bnai.torah.1


B. Sermon: The Mystery of the Mountain

In the Dayenu hymn in the Passover Haggadah, we list all the wonders that G‑d did for us when we left Egypt. After each of the fifteen stanzas of this hymn we say, "dayenu"—"it would have sufficed us."

"If He had brought us out from Egypt, and had not carried out judgments against them—dayenu, it would have sufficed us!" etc.

One of the stanzas says: "If He had brought us to Mount Sinai, but not given us the Torah—dayenu!" Now this seems puzzling. What in the world would be the point of going to Mount Sinai if not to receive the Torah? What other point is there in being there? After all, at this particular mountain there is neither food, nor water or skiing...

Something special happened at Sinai even before G‑d appeared to the Jewish peopleBut actually, something very special happened at Sinai even before G‑d appeared to the Jewish people. The Torah tells us that "Vayichan sham Yisrael neged hahar," "Israel camped there opposite the mountain." The biblical commentator Rashi points out that the word the Torah uses, וַיִחַן (vayichan), is in the singular tense—"he camped" rather than "they camped."

This, Rashi explains, denotes that the entire nation encamped there as one man with one heart.

The Dayenu tells us that if all that was accomplished was the Jewish people standing united for one moment—this itself is an accomplishment of amazing worth. Coming together as one and putting aside all our differences for a greater purpose is one of the greatest mitzvot we can do. It stands on its own, and was a moment of closeness to G‑d that carried significance even if the Torah had not been given.

C. Important Shavuot Laws and Customs Information,  and Eruv Tavshilin 
See these links  so you can  read online before Yom Tov or download and print to have for Yom Tov 
Full times and Laws and Customs appear below these links:

1. Links: Laws and Customs:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/1zFB03v19473WHMr42z6X3kFjUyKUegg-/view?usp=sharing

2. Links: Siddur companion to Shavuot Liturgy:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/1RuW3EoZLVk1WFGgnbBluLK408M9tjKvS/view?usp=sharing

3. Links: Tikun Torah Study Companion: https://drive.google.com/file/d/10lsc_aNW8Su5JaKaErTimGqzCqv0CBwn/view?usp=sharing

4. Links - Laws of cooking on Yom Tov: https://www.cor.ca/view/169:2/cooking_on_yom_tov.html

5. Full Texts of Laws and Customs / Eruv Tavshilin
SHAVUOT
The Laws and the Service of Shavuot /Eruv Tavshilin Orthodox Union  Staff – lightly edited and carefully modified for CBT by Rabbi Yaffe
   
What are the Laws and Service of Shavuot? As with all of the Jewish Holidays, the Laws and Service of the Day are intertwined. For our holidays are days of special service to the “Ribono shel Olam,” the Master of the Universe, Whose Written Torah decreed, and Whose Oral Torah defined and expanded upon, the

Z’man Matan Torateinu (The Time of the Giving of Our Torah) All the prayers and the Kiddush of this holiday are similar to the prayers and the Kiddush of the others of the Three Regalim (the others: Pesach and Sukkot), with the exception that Shavuot too has its own unique description: “et yom chag HaShavuot hazeh, z’man matan torateinu,” “this Day of Shavuot, the time of the Giving of the Torah.”
In the Mussaf Prayer, the Additional Prayers include mention of the unique sacrifice associated with Shavuot, including the “Two Breads,” the Grain Offering brought on the “fiftieth day,” so to speak, after the bringing of the Omer on the second day of Pesach. This Offering was brought from “new wheat.”

Mussaf (Additional) Prayer The description of the Additional Offering of Shavuot is introduced by the following paragraph:
UVYOM HABIKURIM, (And on the day of the first fruits,)

B’hak-riv’chem mincho chadosho Ladonoy, (When you bring a new meal offering to Hashem,)

B’shovu-osaychem, (On your Festival of Weeks;)

Mikro kodesh yih-ye lochem, (There shall be a holy convocation for you,)

Kol m’leches avodo lo sa-asu. (You may not do any laborious work.)

Other Prayer-ful Features of Shavuot bHallel is completed, as it is on the other “Regalim.”
When the Kiddush is recited, the “bracha,” or blessing, of “She-he-cheyanu,” “the One Who kept us alive,” is included. When the woman-of-the-house, in general, makes the blessings on the candles, she includes that bracha as well, before the candles are lit.
Even though on every other “Erev Yom Tov,” Holiday Eve, the Evening Services are begun somewhat earlier, in order to be “mosif min ha-chol al ha-kodesh,” “to add from the mundane time to the holy time,” on Shavuot we specifically do not do that!
Why not? Because the Torah says that “sheva shabbatot t’mimot,” “seven complete weeks” should transpire before Shavuot, and if we start early, that “t’mimiyut,” or “completeness” will be lacking! Kiddush should also not be recited before it is definitely night-time (three medium-size stars should be visible in the sky).

“Yom Tov Sheni shel Galuyot” (Second Day of the Holiday Celebrated Only in Diaspora)The meaning of this concept is that in the Diaspora, two days of holiday are celebrated where the Torah speaks of only one.

Shavuot Torah Readings, Haftarot and Megillat Ruth
On the first day of Shavuot, the reading is from Parshat Yitro, in the Book of Shemot, from “In the third month after the Jewish People left Egypt” till the end of the Parshah. This reading covers the event of “Maamad Har Sinai,” the stand of the Jewish People at Mt. Sinai, to receive the Torah.

The Maftir, the Second Torah Reading of the Holiday, comes from one of the sections of the Torah which deals directly with the Holiday of Shavuot, beginning “Uv’yom HaBikkurim,” “The Day of the Bringing of the First Fruits.”

The Reading from the Prophets on the first day of Shavuot comes from Yechezkel which deals with the mystical subject of the “Divine Chariot,” which also deals with a Revelation of G-d in prophecy to an individual but, through his book, to all of Israel.

On the Second day in the Diaspora, the First Torah Reading is from “All the First Born,” which deals with the various holidays, the second again from “Uv’yom HaBikkurim,” and the Reading from the Prophets from Chavakuk, which deals with a vision of Hashem in His holy Palace.

On the Second Day in the Diaspora, and on the one day of Shavuot in Eretz Yisrael, Megillat Ruth is read after Hallel. Various reasons for reading the Megillah on Shavuot are given.

Some are as follows: The conversion of Ruth to Judaism was by a painful route, as seen in the Story of Ruth, just as the acceptance of the Torah by the Jewish People was via the painful route of years of slavery in Egypt! The time of the year in which the events of the Megillah took place was in the grain-cutting season, as it says “in the beginning of the cutting of barley,” and one of the names of Shavuot is “Chag HaKatzir,” the Holiday of Grain Cutting.

The law that allowed Ruth to join the Jewish People was based on the Oral Law. Because according to the Written Law, “No Amonite or Moabite may enter the Jewish People (by marriage).” The Oral Law differentiated between the male Moabite and the female Moabitess, because the exclusion was tied to the cruelty of those nations, and those cruel decisions were made exclusively by the males – to show the importance of the Oral Law in the Jewish System, in the role of providing definition and explication of the Written Law.

Eruv Tavshilin On Jewish holidays, within each 24-hour (night-day) holiday unit, we are permitted to make preparations for all of that unit, but we are forbidden to make any preparations for the following unit, which begins after nightfall. 

The one exception is when a Friday holiday is followed seamlessly by Shabbat, in which case, cooking is permissible on Friday through a mechanism known as an eruv tavshilin, whereby the cooking process is begun prior to the holiday. If a holiday day -- whether the first or second day of a holiday -- falls on a Friday, an eruv tavshilin is set aside on the day preceding the holiday (Wednesday or Thursday afternoon), so that we will be permitted to prepare for Shabbat (cooking as well as any other necessary preparations) on the holiday. Only one eruv is required per household.

This eruv consists of a matzah, and a cooked food, such as meat, fish, or an unpeeled hard-boiled egg. Take the food items (it is a good idea to wrap them in aluminum foil, or another distinctive packaging, to easily keep them apart from the rest of the foods in your home), and give them to another person (if possible an individual who is a non-dependant), and say:

I hereby grant a share in this eruv to anyone who wishes to participate in it and to depend on it.
The one holding the food raises it a handbreadth, and then returns it to the person making the eruv, who then recites the following:

Blessed are you, L-rd our G‑d, king of the universe, who has sanctified us with his commandments, and commanded us concerning the mitzvah of eruv.
Through this [eruv] it shall be permissible for us to bake, cook, put away a dish [to preserve its heat], kindle a light, prepare, and do on the holiday all that is necessary for Shabbat -- for us and for all the Israelites who dwell in this city.
The eruv is put away until Shabbat, when it is eaten. In many communities, it is customary to use the  matzah as one of the two loaves used at the Shabbat meal.
 
Important notes:
The eruv tavshilin only allows food preparations if the food will be ready with ample time remaining before Shabbat; enough time to theoretically allow the food to be consumed before sunset (if a troop of guests happens to trudge in to your home). This is an imporant detail to bear in mind when preparing the cholent, which cooks on the stove until the following day.
The eruv tavshilin only allows one to cook on Friday for Shabbat, it does not permit cooking from one day of the holiday to the next (i.e. Thursday for Friday).

On holidays it is only permissible to cook from a pre-existent flame, one that is burning since the onset of the holiday.